New Hooked on Wild Waters Trailer by Drew Gregory

We’ve teased this for a while now, so it is time to finally come clean with all the facts about these exciting new trailer/s that so many of you have been inquiring about! If you don’t need to carry 4 kayaks, keep reading because there is a version that holds one or two as well! If you already know all there is about this trailer and are ready to place an order, do so through this form!

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As you all know, I put a lot of many miles on my vehicle and kayak trailer. Several years ago I was having a hard time finding a safe, solid, full size frame/tire trailer, with a substantial weight capacity to haul around kayaks and heavy fishing gear. The 300-400lb weight capacity, tiny tires and small aluminum frame trailers were just not holding up for me and not worth the risk of breaking down, ruining my kayaks and potentially endangering others by causing an accident on the interstate. My friend Brooks mentioned that TN Trailers had come out with a cool kayak version, so I checked it out. It already looked awesome, so I called them up and they promptly became part of the sponsorship team for Hooked on Wild Waters and the River Bassin Tournament Trail. I drove that first trailer I got from them over 60,000 miles, until I finally realized it is as solid as they claimed it was! Their company has been building bass boat and pontoon boat trailers since 1958, so I wasn’t surprised when it held up as well as they told me it would. So, from that point on, I was a believer. Recently I got together with the TN Trailers crew, and I was mentioning some ideas that could be good for a new model. Out of that conversation the Hooked on Wild Waters by Drew Gregory edition started to take form!

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So, what are some of the features, specs and pricing of the different variations of this new trailer? I’ll list them below and then get into detail about them further down. Keep in mind there are two versions; one version is a single tier H-rack style that holds 2 kayaks (flat) and the other is a double tier model that will hold 4 kayaks (its the one you see in the photos). Obviously you can carry more if you turn the kayaks on their sides. For sake of this article we’ll call the single tier trailer the HOWW Single and then we’ll call the double tier version the HOWW Double. If you just literally want the most basic kayak trailer (and the least expensive) from TN Trailers, check out the Little Frog or Big Frog.

HOWW Trailer/s Specs & Features:

Carry Capacity: 2100lbs (HOWW Single) 2650lbs (HOWW Double)
Trailer Lights: Submersible with lifetime warranty
Frame: 4×2 Steel
Length: 14.6 (HOWW Single) 15.6 (HOWW Double)
Width: 62 inches (HOWW Single) 78 inches (HOWW Double)
Post/Crossbars: H-rack (HOWW Single) 6ft post height w/ (2), 78 inch crossbars
Paint: Matte army green, matte desert sand, matte black, grey w/ lime pinstripes (color shown in photos)
Tires: 175/13C radials (HOWW Single) 205/14C radials (HOWW Double)
Wheels: 13 inch aluminum (HOWW Single) 14 inch aluminum (HOWW Double)
Utility Bed: 62″x 44″ (HOWW Single) 72 x 56 (HOWW Double)
Spare Included: yes, on both models
Lockable Rod Storage System: 1 on HOWW Single (holds 4 rods/reels) & 2 on HOWW Double (holds 8 rods/reels)
Lockable Wet/Dry Gear Box: Standard on both models. 44″ box on HOWW Single & 56″ on HOWW Double
Utility bed lighting system: Standard on both models. Designed for easy night strapping & unstrapping kayaks
Cooler Carrier: Standard on both models. For size comparison, it holds an Orion 65 Qt or smaller.
Lengthwise hull running boards: TBD (HOWW Single) Standard on HOWW Double
Numerous tie down points [] Grip Tape Standing Areas [] Additional Trailer Receiver 
Price: $2584 (HOWW Single) $2925 (HOWW Double)

Getting into detail about some of the more unique features, I’ll start with the obvious – the unique lockable rod storage system. It is the feature that people mention the most when they see it. It is different because it serves the purpose of keeping your reels and rods locked up, and snug on the drive, but without a full length rod box, which can drive the cost to the consumer way up. The version you see in the photos is actually our first prototype, the consumer version will be more refined and even better than this first version is. Each rod box is near the front of the trailer and you simply open the hinging door (the entire side will open on production models rather than just the smaller door pictured in this prototype, making it easier to get rods/reels in), slide your rods/reels inside and then through the corresponding holes all the way to the Rod Saver rod tip inserts near the rear of the trailer. Once you close the door you can add a small Masterlock to ensure the safety of your reels.

Some have asked about any potential rocks being kicked up and hitting your rods while on the highway. While we feel this is highly unlikely and have not seen it occur in our tests, we have made this system compatible with a Rod Glove for added protection. Simply transport them in the rod glove and you should be 100% fine. The other option that the consumer can add on is simple PVC tubing corresponding with each rod, if they choose. It is “possible” that rocks can get kicked up on the interstate, but we feel it is highly unlikely one will ever hit your rods because of the box protecting them in front (the direction a rock will come from) and the wheel fenders protecting from the bottom. If a rock does kick up and actually hit your rods, it will almost certainly be from another vehicle, not yours, and it would have to come at a sideways angle to actually hit them, which again is unlikely. If you feel this is a real possibility, then we suggest purchasing rod gloves or adding the tubing/pipe to protect them.

     

Lockable Wet/Dry Gear Box:  If you’re like me you always have wet, muddy and/or stinky clothes, shoes or life jackets after a kayak fishing trip. So, we obviously needed a place to store these items, that was not inside our vehicle. Our lockable gear box allows for ventilation on the back side, while keeping a solid front side so that road grime does not kick up on your gear. It is also a great place to store any other valuable items, since it can be locked up. On the HOWW Double version the box is long enough for paddles (possibly on the single as well). I also keep my Plano soft plastics cases in there and some of my extra stowaway tackle boxes, and other accessories that I’ll be rigging on my kayak when I get to my location.

 

The high weight capacity and cargo floor may not seem super exciting, but it really is a feature that makes this trailer such a great deal and more versatile. For example, I’ve taken off my t-posts and used this as a straight up cargo trailer when my wife and I needed to move some large pieces of furniture or a mattress. Having such a high weight capacity is also great if you have an ATV or just a ton of kayaks and fishing gear that you want to haul. I feel safe knowing that if I have 400-600lbs of stuff on my trailer I’ll be plenty fine, as opposed to 400-600lbs on a trailer that is only rated for 400 or  500lbs. I know I feel safe and confident when I’m driving away, which is important when I have my family with me while we’re covering so many miles.

Lengthwise running boards. Another feature that isn’t the flashiest, but one of the most important on this trailer. Each location for securing a kayak has 2 carpeted running boards that run parallel with the trailer. These are adjustable so that you can space them properly for each of your kayak’s hulls. Strapping down kayaks on bars that go perpendicular causes dents to your hulls and other major damage that affects your kayak’s performance.

   

Utility Bed Lighting System: Let’s face it, this is just a fancy way to explain that we’ve put an LED light on the inside beam so that you can load and unload kayaks in the dark a lot easier than before. Simply flip the switch next to the lockable rod storage box and your light turns on! Great for a little light at night to rig up too.

  

Cooler Carrier:
Fits a 65 QT Orion Cooler or smaller, and has strong locking/tie down points. Also can be used for transporting a number of other items such as crates or other gear boxes.

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Grip Taped Standing Area & Numerous Tie Down Locations:

              

Additional Trailer Receiver: Why would a trailer have another receiver on it? These days there are so many accessories that attach via a receiver, that it makes sense for a trailer to have one as well. I’ve put my Thule bike rack on the back of this trailer to bring my wife and I’s bikes along with us on many occasions. Also, I’ve attached the Boonedox T-Bone here for when I’m transporting a kayak on the lower level. It actually came in handy to rescue a friend one time when his truck broke down. We hitched his trailer up to this trailer and “snaked” our way back to town where he could get it all fixed (We were in TN, where there is no law against double trailering, but check your local laws before you do anything like that, and only do it in an emergency). 

How to order: If you’re smart, and you’ve read all the way down to this point, then I’m here to give all the Hooked on Wild Waters fans a discount off the MSRP. Just another perk for following the show, blog, podcasts or being a part of the River Bassin’ Tournament Trail. To see the special HOWW fan pricing, and to order your HOWW Trailer, just fill out this form. If you still have questions about it, please email me directly at drew@drewgregory.com or call me at 706-540-4280.

Additional Photos:

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